◄ Why do people flee from their countries?

The Crow and The Fox

written by Gell‚ert Kovacs

The topic of immigration from the Middle East and Africa is a dividing one in the richer and poorer countries of Europe alike. As the Eurpean population basicly unifically belives in the democratic values, the distrust and exclusion directed towards the refugees is inexcusable. Equality means one should turn with as much care and help to foreigners seeking shelter as to his fellow countrymen.

The Crow and The Fox
 
Master Crow sat on a wall, high as his Greed,
Holding a cheese in his beak.
Master Fox, starving for weeks,
swallowed his pride and asked for the cheese.
"Mister Crow, good day to you.
Well-fed you seem, please, spare some food."
Hearing these words the crow felt Tightwad,
Thought, for this wheel he has worked so hard!
"But Mister Crow - argued the Fox -
You are the idol of Freedom, saviour of poor!"
In response the Crow - may I add, proudly -
Opened his mouth, screeming "Exactly!",
Only to notice his stupidity.
The Fox seized the cheese and said: "My good sir,
Hear this lesson for the Future:
Don't belie yourself, you'll look like a Poseur!"
 
The Crow, embarassed and confused,
Realised, though somewhat later, that the Fox was righteous,
and changed his ways.

The original work of La Fontane (translated to English) reads as follows:

The Crow and The Fox

 

Master Crow sat on a tree,
Holding a cheese in his beak.
Master Fox was attracted by the odour,
And tried to attract him thus.
"Mister Crow, good day to you.
You are a handsome and good looking bird!
In truth, if your song is as beautiful as your plumage,
You are the Phoenix of this forest."
Hearing these words the Crow felt great joy,
And to demonstrate his beautiful voice,
He opened his mouth wide and let drop his prey.
The Fox seized it and said: "My good Sir,
Know that every flatterer,
Lives at the expense of those who take him seriously:
This is a lesson that is worth a cheese no doubt."
 
The Crow, embarrassed and confused,
Swore, though somewhat later, that he would never be 
tricked thus again.

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